The gentle approach

Horsemanship

“The horse is a mirror. It goes deep into the body. When I see your horse I see you too. It shows me everything you are, everything about the horse.”

~Ray Hunt

The Horses Brain

Thanks to science we are now able to have the knowledge of how a horse’s brain works, how it is wired, responds to stress AND what training techniques cause the greatest amounts of learning in the least stressful environment. Isn’t this what we all want for our horses?

What Wikipedia Has to Say:

 

Natural horsemanship is a collective term for a variety of horse training techniques which have seen rapid growth in popularity since the 1980s. The techniques vary in their precise tenets but generally share principles of “a kinder and gentler cowboy” to develop a rapport with horses, using methods said to be derived from observation of the natural behavior of free-roaming horses and rejecting abusive training methods.

The modern natural horsemanship movement, though not originally described as such, developed primarily in the United States Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountain states, where the “buckaroo” or vaquero-style cowboy tradition was the strongest. Brothers Tom and Bill Dorrance were early modern practitioners, who had background in the Great Basin buckaroo tradition. They had a particularly strong influence on Ray Hunt, who in turn became a significant influence upon Buck Brannaman. Many practitioners claim influence from the Dorrance brothers and Hunt, some having trained directly with these individuals.

 

Can you put that in simpler terms please?

Yes we can! Keep on reading…

NATURAL HORSEMANSHIP EXPLAINED:

Natural Horsemanship is the softer, long lasting approach

 

In my experience, natural horsemanship is about developing a partnership with my horse where I can accomplish our goals in the best way for the horse. Gone are the harsh bits, draw reins, martingales, lunging the horses to exhaustion… Horsemanship is a relationship that you will develop with your horse over time. It is not a program that you go into for a couple of months to “fix” your horse and then forget about it. It is a journey for both of you. Anytime I set foot into the barn and open a stall door, I learn something new from each horse. It is an exciting life journey of knowledge for yourself and your equine partners.

Is natural horsemanship right for me?

 

Natural horsemanship applies to every discipline; dressage, hunter/jumpers, roping, endurance… the list goes on. The less conflict you have with your horse, the better your performance or more enjoyable your rides will be. Natural horsemanship is not a quick fix. It isn’t a two month program where you quickly learn, and then off you go. It is a journey that you embark on for you and your horse.

OUR METHOD

 

True Feel Horsemanship seeks to combine aspects of natural horsemanship and the evidence provided by science to give horses the safest, lowest stress learning environment possible at THEIR pace. Below are some interesting Tidbits about the horse’s brain:

Lick & Chew?

Did you know when your horse licks and chews they are dropping back into the parasympathetic nervous system which is associated with rest, digest and rebuild. It is known for its restorative response and relaxation.

What Stresses a Horse?

Restraint and isolation are the 2 biggest stressors in horses

Herd or Alone?

Serotonin is a neurochemical that is related to emotional balance and is higher in horses that are in herds than in isolated horses.

Give Your Horse a Break

When we give our horses a break after doing something correct it is actually helping neurons make connections!

Lick & Chew?

Did you know when your horse licks and chews they are dropping back into the parasympathetic nervous system which is associated with rest, digest and rebuild. It is known for its restorative response and relaxation.

Herd or Alone?

Serotonin is a neurochemical that is related to emotional balance and is higher in horses that are in herds than in isolated horses.

Give Your Horse a Break

When we give our horses a break after doing something correct it is actually helping neurons make connections!

What Stresses a Horse?

Restraint and isolation are the 2 biggest stressors in horses

Interested to learn more about horse brain science?

Please visit Dr. Steve Peters website